Kent County Government - Water and Waste Water Services

Mike Wojton, Deputy Director
709 Morgnec Road
Chestertown, MD 21620
Ph: 410-778-3287
Fax: 410 - 778-7487
e-mail:

Facilities Map


Edesville

The Village of Edesville is provided with public water and sewer service by the Kent County Department of Water and Wastewater Services.  Water is supplied by the Town of Rock Hall through a user agreement with the County.  The County provides domestic water and fire suppression services through a single interconnect with the Rock Hall water system and a 100,000 gallon elevated storage tank in Edesville. 
Sewage collected in the Edesville area is conveyed to the Town of Rock Hall wastewater treatment plant for treatment through a similar agreement.  The collection system is a mix of small diameter and standard gravity collection and septic tank effluent pump system (STEP).  The small diameter collection and STEP systems utilize a septic tank as pretreatment to remove solids, grease, grit and other material that would clog the small diameter collection system.  These tanks are pumped out on three (3) year cycle by the County.  All of the wastewater is collected at one main pumping station that transfers the sewage to a pump station in the Piney Neck service area were it gets pumped again to the Rock Hall Wastewater Treatment Plant.

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Fairlee

The villages of Fairlee and Georgetown are provided with public water and sewer service by the Kent County Department of Water and Wastewater Services.   Treated water is provided by the Fairlee Water Treatment Plant owned and operated by the County.  The plant is alternately fed by one (1) of two (2) 250 gallon per minute wells withdrawing groundwater from the upper Patapsco Aquifer within the Potomac Group formation.  The plant uses a chemical and mechanical treatment process for the removal of iron and pH adjustment. The treated water provides domestic and fire suppression services to the village of Fairlee and Georgetown with two (2) 100,000 gallon elevated storage tanks, one located at the Water Treatment Plant in Fairlee and the other located on Georgetown Road.
The sewage collection system consists of standard gravity and low pressure grinder pump collection systems and several sewage pumping stations.  The low pressure system is comprised of individual grinder pumps located on each property that pump the wastewater to collection system consisting of various size pipes.  All of the wastewater from the Fairlee and Georgetown service areas is pumped to the Tolchester Wastewater Treatment Plant for treatment.  See Tolchester for treatment information.

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Kennedyville

The village of Kennedyville is provided with public water and sewer service by the Kent County Department of Water and Wastewater Services.   Treated water is provided by the Kennedyville Water Treatment Plant owned and operated by the County.  Water is alternately supplied by one (1) of two (2) 110 gallon per minute wells with drawing groundwater from the Monmouth Aquifer.   The uses a chemical and mechanical treatment process for iron removal. The plant provides treated water for domestic and fire suppression services to the village of Kennedyville from a 75,000 gallon elevated storage tank.

The Kennedyville sewer collection system is a standard gravity collection system with three pumping stations that convey all of the wastewater to the Kennedyville Wastewater Treatment Plant for treatment.  The plant is an Aqua-Aerobics sequential batch reactor (SBR) treatment system that treats the wastewater collected from Kennedyville.  The effluent from the plant is disinfected by ultraviolet light prior to discharging to an unnamed tributary of the Morgan Creek. The plant has a design capacity of 60,000 gallons per day. Our current average daily flow is approximately 15,000 gallons per day.

 

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Millington

The Kent County Department of Water and Wastewater Services provide public water and sewer service portions of the unincorporated areas adjacent to the Town of Millington boundaries.   Water is supplied by the Town of Millington through an agreement between the County and Town.  Fire suppression services are provided through the Town’s 250,000 gallon elevated storage tank.   The County service areas include the Sandfield subdivision, properties along River Road, Route 291 west of Town extending to the River’s Edge subdivision and north of town extending along Sassafras Street.

Sewage collected in the unincorporated areas of Millington by the County is conveyed to the Town of Millington wastewater treatment plant for treatment.  The sewage collected system consists of standard gravity and low pressure grinder pump collection systems and two sewage pumping stations.  The subdivision of Sandfield is a standard gravity collection system with a pumping station that pumps the sewage to the Town’s gravity collection system.  The properties west and north of town are primarily served through grinder pumps connected to a low pressure collection system.  The low pressure system is comprised of individual grinder pumps located on each property that pump the wastewater to collection system consisting of various size pipes.  The pressurized collection system discharges to a County pumping station near the Town’s boundary on Route 291 which pumps it to the Town’s collection system.   Properties served along the Chesterville Forest Road are also connected to the Route 291 low pressure system.       

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Piney Neck

The Piney Neck area is a Kent County Department of Water and Wastewater Services sewer service only area collecting wastewater from the homes along Crosby Road, McKinleyville Road, Skinners Neck, Piney Neck and the properties outside of the Town of Rock Hall boundary along Route 20, Sharp Street and Pine Lane.  Sewage collected in the Piney Neck area is conveyed to the Town of Rock Hall wastewater treatment plant for treatment through a user agreement.  All of the properties in the service area with the exception of the Crosby Woods subdivision are served through grinder pumps connected to a low pressure collection system.  The system is comprised of individual grinder pumps located on each property that pump the wastewater to collection system consisting of various size pipes and three main pumping stations.  The Crosby Woods subdivision is served by a standard gravity collection system.  The Wesley Chapel pumping station located on Crosby Road near Route 20 pumps all of the sewage from this service area and Edesville directly to the Rock Hall Wastewater Treatment Plant for treatment and final discharge to Grays Inn Creek.

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Quaker Neck

Kent County Department of Water and Wastewater Services operates and maintains the Quaker Neck sewer service area collection system.   The area collects wastewater from properties along Quaker Neck Road (Rt. 289) from the Town of Chestertown boundary south to Lovers Lane, including the Aldan Drive, County Club Estates, Quaker Neck Estates and the properties along Lovers Lane.  Sewage collected in the Quaker Neck area is conveyed to the Town of Chestertown wastewater treatment plant for treatment under a sewer agreement.

The sewage collected system consists of a mix of standard gravity and low pressure grinder pump collection systems and two sewage pumping stations.  The low pressure system is comprised of individual grinder pumps located on each property that pump the wastewater to collection system consisting of various size pipes.  This system extends from Wilkins Lane to Airy Hill Road.  Due to orientation of some of the homes along Quaker Neck Road gravity collection was not accessible and grinder pumps are used to serve several properties. 

The main pumping station located at the intersection of Rt. 289 and John Hanson Road collects the domestic sewerage flow from a gravity collection system along Rt. 289, the County Club Estates and receives flow from the second station. The second pumping station is located just north of the intersection of Wilkins Lane and Rt. 289. Ultimately, the wastewater is pumped by the main pumping station to the Chestertown Wastewater Treatment Plant located off of John Hanson Road for final treatment and disposal to the Chester River.

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Rudnick & Little Neck

Rudnick and Little Neck Subdivisions - these two subdivisions are serviced by a "Shared Facility" that was installed by a developer and turned over to the Kent County Department of Water and Wastewater Services for operations and maintenance. The facility consists of a large septic system that discharges the septic tank effluent from each of the lots served to common leach fields and into the soil.  Each property has an individual septic tank that either flows to the septic system by gravity or is pumped to the field drain system.

The Rudnick Subdivision provides service to nine (9) lots outside the town boundaries of Galena located at the junction of Rt. 313, Rt. 290, and Irelands Corner Roads. There are no additional allocations available once the nine lots are built out.

The Little Neck Subdivision provides service to a 17 lot subdivision located on Burris Road in Little Neck Farm. Like Rudnick, no additional building can occur when the 17 lots are built out.

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Spring Cove / Green Lane

Kent County Department of Water and Wastewater Services operates and maintains the Spring Cove / Green Lane sewer service area collection system.   The area collects wastewater from properties outside of the Town of Rock Hall boundaries.  Sewage collected in this service area is conveyed to the Town of Rock Hall sewer collection system for treatment at their wastewater treatment facility under a sewer agreement between the County and Town.  These two areas are adjacent to the town boundary of Rock Hall, Spring Cove on the north side and Green Lane and Allen’s Lane on the south side. The systems collect sewer from the homes along Route 445 extending from the Town limits north to Carter Avenue and south to Grays Inn Landing Road.  All of the properties in the service area are served through grinder pumps connected to a low pressure collection system.  The system is comprised of individual grinder pumps located on each property that pump the wastewater to collection system consisting of various size pipes discharging into the Town’s gravity sewer collection system.

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Tolchester

Kent County Department of Water and Wastewater Services operates and maintains the Tolchester sewer service area, collecting wastewater from Tolchester Estates, Tolchester Heights and Delta Heights.  The sewage collection system consists of and low pressure grinder pump collection systems and two sewage pumping stations.  The low pressure system is comprised of individual grinder pumps located on each property that pump the wastewater to collection system consisting of various size pipes.  All of the wastewater collected is pumped to the County’s Tolchester Wastewater Treatment Plant for treatment. 

The Tolchester Wastewater Treatment Plant was constructed in 1996 to treat the wastewater collected from Tolchester and Fairlee/Georgetown service areas. The plant is a Jet-Tech sequential batch reactor (SBR) treatment system that treats the wastewater and has the ability to physically and mechanically reduce phosphorus and nitrogen levels in the wastewater.  The plant has a design capacity of 265,000 gallons per day and currently has an average daily flow of approximately 80,000 gallons per day. The plant effluent is disinfected by Ultraviolet light prior to discharging to the Chesapeake Bay, through an 8 inch line from the plant to approximately 1,100 feet from the shoreline off the end of Ohio Avenue in Tolchester.

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Worton / Butlertown

The villages of Worton and Butlertown are provided with public water and sewer service by the Kent County Department of Water and Wastewater Services.   Treated water is provided by the Worton Water Treatment Plant owned and operated by the County.  The Water Treatment Plant is feed by alternating two (2) 150 gallon per minute wells with chemical and mechanical treatment processes for iron removal and pH adjustment. The plant provides domestic and fire suppression services to the villages of Worton and Butlertown, as well as the Kent County High and Worton Elementary Schools from a 125,000 gallon elevated storage tank in Worton and a 250,000 gallon elevated storage tank in Butlertown.

The Worton sewer collection system is a standard gravity collection system with four (4) pumping stations that convey all of the wastewater to the Worton Wastewater Treatment Plant for treatment.  The plant is GE Zenon membrane bioreactor system that treats the wastewater from the Worton/Butlertown collection system.  The plant has a design capacity of 250,000 gallons per day. Our current average daily flow is approximately 75,000 gallons per day.  It has the ability to physically and mechanically reduce phosphorus and nitrogen levels in the wastewater enhanced nutrient removal limits.  The treated water is pulled through the ultra-filtration membrane and disinfected by ultraviolet light prior to being discharged.  The effluent from the plant can be discharged to unnamed tributary of the Morgan Creek between November and May or stored in storage lagoons at the facility.  The stored effluent can also be discharged from the plant to a land application system maintained by the Department that sprays the water on 68 acres of agricultural land for crop irrigation purposes.     
The Worton Wastewater Treatment also receives and treats all of the septage from septic and holding tanks in the County.  Septage Haulers are charged $0.07 per gallon to dump, unless they are dumping a load from a Health Department approved holding tank then they are only charged $0.02 per gallon.

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